THEME BY PISTACHI-O

We ♥ Newfoundland

oldcanada:

St. John’s, Nfld

Pre-1892 & 1892

The Great Fire of St. John’s



whenthetidetookthemall:

Nar bit narrow.

whenthetidetookthemall:

Nar bit narrow.



a-nem-a-men-anemone:

Bay de Verde by Rodrick Dale on Flickr.

a-nem-a-men-anemone:

Bay de Verde by Rodrick Dale on Flickr.




St. John’s, Newfoundland & Labrador. In the 60’s.More amazing work by Fred Herzog.

St. John’s, Newfoundland & Labrador. In the 60’s.
More amazing work by Fred Herzog.



fatsy:

Vocational school on corner of Spingdale and Gilbert street, St. John’s, Newfoundland.

fatsy:

Vocational school on corner of Spingdale and Gilbert street, St. John’s, Newfoundland.



The 1929 tsunami caused about $1 million in property damage on Newfoundland’s Burin Peninsula. Giant waves crushed buildings, swept houses and boats out to sea, and destroyed wharves, flakes, and other structures.

The 1929 tsunami caused about $1 million in property damage on Newfoundland’s Burin Peninsula. Giant waves crushed buildings, swept houses and boats out to sea, and destroyed wharves, flakes, and other structures.



fuckyeahghosttowns:

Abandoned Farm Home in St. David’s, Newfoundland in Canada.(photo + submission by meimeidesign) 
This was once a farm house that was abandoned after a fire in the late 60’s. There are a lot of abandon homes in the area due to resettlement (from the 1960’s to now). Families leave their ancestoral home to move to the larger centers to find work.

This house is in my hometown; I actually went in it when I was younger. The back of the house was burned, but the front was still okay. As I remember there were a lot of old newspapers and magazines in the living area, as well as a tv and some childrens toys. The stairs were also still intact and we went upstairs, but the fire had burned a hole right at the top of them so you couldn’t get around.

fuckyeahghosttowns:

Abandoned Farm Home in St. David’s, Newfoundland in Canada.
(photo + submission by meimeidesign

This was once a farm house that was abandoned after a fire in the late 60’s. There are a lot of abandon homes in the area due to resettlement (from the 1960’s to now). Families leave their ancestoral home to move to the larger centers to find work.

This house is in my hometown; I actually went in it when I was younger. The back of the house was burned, but the front was still okay. As I remember there were a lot of old newspapers and magazines in the living area, as well as a tv and some childrens toys. The stairs were also still intact and we went upstairs, but the fire had burned a hole right at the top of them so you couldn’t get around.



fingolfin:

The home of Steven Henry Isaacs of Port au Bras, Newfoundland, which was swept out to sea by the tunami was anchored to a fishing schooner and towed back to shore.
1929 Grand Banks Earthquake and Tsunami
On November 18, 1929 at 5:02 pm Newfoundland time, a major earthquake occurred approximately 250 km south of Newfoundland along the southern  edge of the Grand Banks. This magnitude 7.2 tremor was felt as far away as New York and Montreal. On  land, damage due to earthquake vibrations was limited to Cape Breton Island where chimneys were overthrown or cracked and where some highways were blocked by minor landslides. A few aftershocks (one as large as magnitude 6) were felt in Nova Scotia and Newfoundland  but caused no damage.
The earthquake triggered a large submarine slump (an estimated  volume of 200 cubic kilometres of material was moved on the Laurentian slope) which ruptured 12 transatlantic cables in multiple places and generated a tsunami. The tsunami was recorded along the eastern seaboard as far south as South Carolina and across the Atlantic Ocean in Portugal.
Approximately 2 1/2 hours after the earthquake the tsunami struck the southern end of the Burin Peninsula in Newfoundland as three main  pulses, causing local sea levels to rise between 2 and 7 metres. At the  heads of several of the long narrow bays on the Burin Peninsula the  momentum of the tsunami carried water as high as 13 metres. This giant sea wave claimed a total of 28 lives - 27 drowned on the Burin peninsula and a young girl never recovered from her injuries and died in 1933. More than 40 local villages in southern Newfoundland were affected,  where numerous homes, ships, businesses, livestock and fishing gear were destroyed. Also lost were more than 280,000 pounds of salt cod. Total property losses were estimated at more than $1 million 1929 dollars (estimated as nearly $20 million 2004 dollars).

I sent a postcard of this image. Now I know the story of it too.

fingolfin:

The home of Steven Henry Isaacs of Port au Bras, Newfoundland, which was swept out to sea by the tunami was anchored to a fishing schooner and towed back to shore.

1929 Grand Banks Earthquake and Tsunami

On November 18, 1929 at 5:02 pm Newfoundland time, a major earthquake occurred approximately 250 km south of Newfoundland along the southern edge of the Grand Banks. This magnitude 7.2 tremor was felt as far away as New York and Montreal. On land, damage due to earthquake vibrations was limited to Cape Breton Island where chimneys were overthrown or cracked and where some highways were blocked by minor landslides. A few aftershocks (one as large as magnitude 6) were felt in Nova Scotia and Newfoundland but caused no damage.

The earthquake triggered a large submarine slump (an estimated volume of 200 cubic kilometres of material was moved on the Laurentian slope) which ruptured 12 transatlantic cables in multiple places and generated a tsunami. The tsunami was recorded along the eastern seaboard as far south as South Carolina and across the Atlantic Ocean in Portugal.

Approximately 2 1/2 hours after the earthquake the tsunami struck the southern end of the Burin Peninsula in Newfoundland as three main pulses, causing local sea levels to rise between 2 and 7 metres. At the heads of several of the long narrow bays on the Burin Peninsula the momentum of the tsunami carried water as high as 13 metres. This giant sea wave claimed a total of 28 lives - 27 drowned on the Burin peninsula and a young girl never recovered from her injuries and died in 1933. More than 40 local villages in southern Newfoundland were affected, where numerous homes, ships, businesses, livestock and fishing gear were destroyed. Also lost were more than 280,000 pounds of salt cod. Total property losses were estimated at more than $1 million 1929 dollars (estimated as nearly $20 million 2004 dollars).

I sent a postcard of this image. Now I know the story of it too.